New! Financing agriculture

In this section, you may find new materials that have been published on the topic of “Financing agriculture” since the date of the event. We continually select major new publications and articles that add up to the policy points discussed in the briefing:

Young, energetic and visionary – Welcome to the country of a thousand hills and a million smiles
canwefeedtheworld, 10 March 2016

Rwanda has the aftermath of the genocide to overcome, but it is remarkable seeing young people in particular seize opportunities for themselves and their communities. They are helping the country get on its feet again, by contributing to its economic growth and prosperity (…) Through STRYDE, TechnoServe supports young people in rural areas to get their business ideas off the ground and become successful entrepreneurs.

– Mobilise domestic revenue for post-2015 agenda
Die-gid, 2 February 2015

The German Development Institute report on “Greater mobilisation of domestic revenue in developing countries – a key issue for the post-2015 agenda” highlights five key points on the importance of financing of the new post-2015 agenda: Firstly, trends are more important than absolute levels e.g. targets to achieving specific tax revenues are unsuitable as generally-valid objectives. Secondly, tax fairness and equity data are crucial references to assess tax systems within the context of the post-2015 agenda. Thirdly, the stability of public revenue is as important as short term hikes in tax collection. Stable revenues are key for the effective planning of public policies and investments – especially in countries where the planning capacity is already low. Diversified tax systems with a broad tax base are less susceptible to external shocks (e.g. fluctuations in terms of trade) and offer greater opportunities to react to unexpected revenue losses. This is a further argument in favour of paying particular attention to the tax mix. Fourthly, more consideration needs to be paid to subnational taxes and levies, whereby governments should take the first step here by collecting and publishing reliable information on tax revenues at subnational levels.  Fifthly, international co-operation on tax matters needs to receive more support for drafting and implementation of international standards such as the automatic exchange of information, reporting obligations for companies, transfers pricing guidelines, identification and recovery of stolen assets and the introduction of a common corporate tax base.

Financing Africa’s Development in the 21st Century

African Executive, 16 October 2013

This is a unique moment in Africa’s economic trajectory. I do not wish to enter the rather sterile debate as whether Africa is rising or not, a debate I follow sometimes with amusement. Each side of the divide can find evidence for whatever they are looking for. It is rather like the current debate about whether it is all over for the Emerging Markets!

Ending aid dependency through tax: emerging research findings
ActionAid, July 2013

Building on previous reports1, ActionAid has commissioned new research into experiences in reducing aid dependency. This paper presents the initial findings of that research. It shows that developing countries have already rapidly reduced their dependence on aid since its peak in 2002.

Domestic resource mobilisation in developing countries – interesting graphs
European Network on Debt and Development, 14 November 2012

I’m in the middle of updating Eurodad’s summary of financial inflows and outflows to developing countries – watch this space – but thought I’d share some really interesting graphs.

Ending aid dependency through tax: emerging research findings
Actionaid, July 2013

Building on previous reports1 ActionAid has commissioned new research into experiences in reducing aid dependency. This paper presents the initial findings of that research. It shows that developing countries have already rapidly reduced their dependence on aid since its peak in 2002. In least developed countries and low income countries, aid has fallen from more than half to just a third of government spending. Increased revenue mobilisation (in most cases through progressive taxation, especially of larger corporations) and sustained economic growth have been key to this success, with the extractives sectors playing a significant role.

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